ClubOfficers.ClubOfficers History

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If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, you'll just have to start one! The hardest part is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves finding some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines some common club officer roles, constitution elements, and typical aspects of getting a club going on your campus.

to:

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, you'll just have to start one! The hardest part is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves finding some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines some common club officer roles, constitution elements, and typical aspects of getting a club going on your campus.

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  • USAC Collegiate Get Started Guide
    An excellent guide to the process of getting a club started on campus, recognized, and licensed to race. This is worth reading even if your club is already started.
to:
  • USAC Collegiate Get Started Guide
    An excellent guide to the process of getting a club started on campus, recognized, and licensed to race. This is worth reading even if your club is already started.
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The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference.

to:

The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference region.

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After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school submits the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, you're ready to race regardless of whether you have one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and throughout this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announce mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, are also strongly encouraged to read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide.

to:

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school submits the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, you're ready to race regardless of whether you have one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and throughout this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announce mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, are also strongly encouraged to read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide.

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Student leadership keeps all of the ECCC's clubs going. This page collects resources to help club officers successfully develop and grow their teams.

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Student leadership keeps all of the ECCC's clubs going. This page collects resources to help club officers successfully develop and grow their teams.

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The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference\\
to:
The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference\\
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The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference
The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference.
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This man has just successfully (re-)started a collegiate cycling team and made it to his first race, Rutgers 2010!
This man has just successfully (re-)started a collegiate cycling team and made it to his first race, Rutgers 2010! (:by Chatura Atapattu:)
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If you have any questions or need some guidance on running your club, don't hesitate to contact conference leadership or put it out there on the mailing list. We're all in this together and there are a lot of experienced team leaders and coaches on the listserv that would be happy to help.

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Annual Calendar

The following is a rough outline of the basic tasks that must get done by most clubs throughout the academic year. More details are available in the USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide.

Note that if you're starting a new club and going to race any of the fall seasons, you must get a USA Cycling club license once your club is recognized, before you start racing. Existing teams generally renew their licenses over the winter, as listed below.

The Dartmouth team plots race strategy and tactics, 2011.
The Dartmouth team plots race strategy and tactics, 2011. (:by Dartmouth:)
  • Late Summer
    • Get Recognized
      Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school for the year and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers for all racers.
  • Fall
    • Track Race!
      Go get your left turn on! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
    • Mountain Bike Race!
      Where we're going, we don't need roads! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
    • Cyclocross Race!
      Mo' mud, mo' betta'! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
    • Order Team Kits
      Custom team cycling clothing is feasible and affordable for teams of all sizes, but has to be done well in advance of racing; place your order by November to have it for the spring season.
    • Attend ECCC Fall Meeting
      The conference meets every year in mid-November to go over general issues, hold team building workshops, and establish the road season schedule. Your team should have someone there.
  • Winter
    • Keep Riders Motivated!
      It's hard to keep team members engaged over the winter; organize off-the-bike social events and fun rides to keep things happening.
    • Renew Club License
      Existing clubs should renew their USAC Collegiate club license for the coming year in December or January.
    • Get Rider Licenses
      Once the club license is set, teams should have riders purchase or renew their individual licenses in January or February, or a few weeks before whatever season they will be racing in (they should be doing all of them!).
    • Attend ECCC Spring Meeting
      Mid-February, the conference holds another meeting to check up on the road season and schedule cyclocross, track, and MTB. Your team should have someone there.
  • Spring
    • Road Race!
      Showtime! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
    • Propose New Budget
      Most schools require clubs to submit budget proposals for next year's funding during the spring term.
    • Hold Elections
      Prepare to hit the ground running next year by deciding who will be the club officers before breaking for the summer. Some teams instead do this over the winter so that the outgoing officers can coach the new leaders.

After all that, take a (short) break and celebrate, you just guided your team through a full year of racing!

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Every team should have several people actively following the eccc-announce mailing list and staying up to date on conference events.

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Every team should have several people following the eccc-announce mailing list and staying up to date on conference events.

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ECCC Club Officers

to:

ECCC Club Officers' Guide

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  • Extensive notes and tips from experienced team leaders on . Every club officer should read this!!!
to:
  • USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide
    Extensive notes and tips from experienced team leaders on running and building your club. Every club officer should read this!!!
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If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, you'll just have to start one! The hardest part is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines some common club officer roles, constitution elements, and typical aspects of getting a club going on your campus.

to:

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, you'll just have to start one! The hardest part is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves finding some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines some common club officer roles, constitution elements, and typical aspects of getting a club going on your campus.

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ECCC racing isn't just about being fast, it's about looking fast. Rock out your own custom team clothing to win the style race.

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Many race promoters organize a large amount of host housing for teams to use and reduce their travel costs.

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– Receive guidance on starting and running a club. – Get information on obtaining or renewing a club license. – Have a ready pointer to share with racers on obtaining their licenses. – Have a ready pointer to share with racers on obtaining upgrades. – Obtain the race schedule for conducting long term planning. – Get flyers for races their team is participating in. – Obtain general information on race costs. – Get ECCC and USAC Collegiate logos for use in team clothing. – Find information on upcoming conference meetings. – Find guidance and policy in promoting a race. – Connect to conference leadership and other teams.

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Putting on an event is the ultimate challenge in club leadership, but also by far one of the most rewarding.

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After all that, take a (short) break and celebrate, you just guided your team through a full year of racing!

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The following are some good resources for team leaders to use throughout the year.

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Custom team cycling clothing is feasible and affordable for teams of all sizes, but has to be done well in advance of racing; place your order by November to have for the spring season.

to:

Custom team cycling clothing is feasible and affordable for teams of all sizes, but has to be done well in advance of racing; place your order by November to have it for the spring season.

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The conference meets every year in mid-November to go over general issues, hold team building workshops, and establish the road season schedule. Your team should have someone there!

to:

The conference meets every year in mid-November to go over general issues, hold team building workshops, and establish the road season schedule. Your team should have someone there.

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Once the club license is set, teams should have riders purchase or renew their individual licenses in January or February, or a few weeks before whatever season they will be racing in.

to:

Once the club license is set, teams should have riders purchase or renew their individual licenses in January or February, or a few weeks before whatever season they will be racing in (they should be doing all of them!).

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Mid-February, the conference holds another meeting to check up on the road season and schedule cyclocross, track, and MTB. Your team should have someone there!

to:

Mid-February, the conference holds another meeting to check up on the road season and schedule cyclocross, track, and MTB. Your team should have someone there.

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Prepare to hit the ground running next year by deciding who will be the club officers for next year before breaking for the summer.

to:

Prepare to hit the ground running next year by deciding who will be the club officers before breaking for the summer. Some teams instead do this over the winter so that the outgoing officers can coach the new leaders.

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Point your riders to the ECCC Racers' Guide? to help them get licenses, determine their categories, and so on.

ClubOfficers.HostHousing

ClubOfficers.RacePromotion

to:

Point your riders to the ECCC Racers' Guide to help them get licenses, determine their categories, and so on.

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Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

to:

Go get your left turn on! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

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Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

to:

Where we're going, we don't need roads! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

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Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

to:

Mo' mud, mo' betta'! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

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It's hard to keep a team active over the winter; organize off-the-bike social events and fun rides to keep things happening.

to:

It's hard to keep team members engaged over the winter; organize off-the-bike social events and fun rides to keep things happening.

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Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

to:

Showtime! Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).

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Note that if you're starting a new club and going to race any of the fall seasons, you must get a USA Cycling club license once your club is recognized, before you start racing. Existing teams generally renew their licenses over the winter.

to:

Note that if you're starting a new club and going to race any of the fall seasons, you must get a USA Cycling club license once your club is recognized, before you start racing. Existing teams generally renew their licenses over the winter, as listed below.

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The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference (ECCC) includes all schools in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Maine. Schools in other states are more than welcome to participate in ECCC races and events, but will be officially part of another conference. To figure out which one, use the map on the USAC Collegiate website.

to:

The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference (ECCC) includes all degree granting schools in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Maine. Schools in other states are more than welcome to participate in ECCC races and events, but will be officially part of another conference. To figure out which one, use the map on the USAC Collegiate website.

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Note that if you're starting a new club and going to race any of the fall seasons, you must get a USA Cycling club license once your club is recognized, before you start racing. Existing teams generally renew their licenses over the winter.

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  • Get Recognized.
    Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school for the year and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, a club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers to the school.
  • Get Licensed.
    If you're starting a new club and going to race any of the fall seasons, you must get a USA Cycling club license once your club is recognized.
to:
  • Get Recognized
    Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school for the year and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers for all racers.
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  • Order team kits.
    Custom team cycling clothing is feasible and affordable for teams of all

sizes, but has a long fulfillment time. Get your order in by November in order to have your stuff in time for the spring season.

  • Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting.\\
to:
  • Order Team Kits
    Custom team cycling clothing is feasible and affordable for teams of all sizes, but has to be done well in advance of racing; place your order by November to have for the spring season.
  • Attend ECCC Fall Meeting\\
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  • Make sure your riders stay motivated
  • Get the club's USAC license squared away
  • Make sure you riders get their licenses
  • Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting.\\
to:
  • Keep Riders Motivated!
    It's hard to keep a team active over the winter; organize off-the-bike social events and fun rides to keep things happening.
  • Renew Club License
    Existing clubs should renew their USAC Collegiate club license for the coming year in December or January.
  • Get Rider Licenses
    Once the club license is set, teams should have riders purchase or renew their individual licenses in January or February, or a few weeks before whatever season they will be racing in.
  • Attend ECCC Spring Meeting\\
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  • Propose new budget.
    Submit budget request to your school's clubs administrators for next year's funding
  • Hold elections for new officers.
to:
  • Propose New Budget
    Most schools require clubs to submit budget proposals for next year's funding during the spring term.
  • Hold Elections
    Prepare to hit the ground running next year by deciding who will be the club officers for next year before breaking for the summer.
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer, as he finally finishes his PhD in literary studies in 2011 and takes a position at the University of Texas-San Antonio. Mama Bear\\
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer, as he finally finishes his PhD in literary studies in 2011 and takes a position at the University of Texas-San Antonio. Mama Bear\\
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer, as he finally finishes his PhD in literary studies in 2011 and takes a position at the University of Texas-San Antonio. Mama Bear\\
to:
The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer, as he finally finishes his PhD in literary studies in 2011 and takes a position at the University of Texas-San Antonio. Mama Bear\\
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. (:by Rutgers:)
to:
The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer, as he finally finishes his PhD in literary studies in 2011 and takes a position at the University of Texas-San Antonio. Mama Bear
The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer, as he finally finishes his PhD in literary studies in 2011 and takes a position at the University of Texas-San Antonio. (:by Rutgers:)
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The US Military Academy team celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship.
The US Military Academy team celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship. (:by Carol Mueller McManus:)
to:
The US Military Academy celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship.
The US Military Academy celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship. (:by Carol Mueller McManus:)
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The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011.
The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011. (:by Dartmouth:)
to:
The Dartmouth team plots race strategy and tactics, 2011.
The Dartmouth team plots race strategy and tactics, 2011. (:by Dartmouth:)
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After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school submits the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, you're ready to race regardless of whether you have one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and throughout this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announc mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, are also strongly encouraged to read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide.

to:

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school submits the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, you're ready to race regardless of whether you have one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and throughout this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announce mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, are also strongly encouraged to read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide.

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apply=divwidth=500px%The US Military Academy team celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship.\\
to:
The US Military Academy team celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship.\\
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apply=divwidth=500px%The US Military Academy team celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship.
The US Military Academy team celebrates its 2011 USAC Collegiate D2 Track Team Omnium Championship. (:by Carol Mueller McManus:)
Changed lines 17-19 from:

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school submits the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, you're ready to race regardless of whether you have one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and throughout this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announc mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, should also read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide to help you on your way.

From there, clubs vary enormously and the real hard work of recruiting and retaining members, getting to races, and building your team begins. Most clubs receive some financial support from their school, though the range is very wide and many schools do not provide funding in the first year. Some clubs remain just a handful of members doing a few races. Others have grown into varsity programs with full time coaches and sophisticated, extensive racing and developmental programs. Where your club goes is up to you, so make it happen!

to:

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school submits the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, you're ready to race regardless of whether you have one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and throughout this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announc mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, are also strongly encouraged to read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide.

From there, clubs vary enormously and the real hard work begins of recruiting members, getting to races, and building your team. Most clubs receive some financial support from their school, though the range is very wide and many schools do not provide funding in the first year. Some clubs remain just a handful of riders doing a few races. Others have grown into varsity programs with full time coaches and sophisticated, extensive racing and developmental programs. Where your club goes is up to you, so make it happen!

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Once recognized by your school, your team must get a club license from USA Cycling, which must also be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process involving a 2 page form and $50 fee, which is even waived for first year clubs.

to:

Once recognized by your school, your team must get a club license from USA Cycling, which must also be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process involving a 2 page form and $50 fee, which is even waived the first year.

Changed line 13 from:

Once recognized by your school, your team must get a club license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process involving a 2 page form and $50 fee, which is even waived for first year clubs.

to:

Once recognized by your school, your team must get a club license from USA Cycling, which must also be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process involving a 2 page form and $50 fee, which is even waived for first year clubs.

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Once recognized by your school, your team must get a '''club license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process involving a 2 page form and $50 fee, which is even waived for first year clubs.

If you get really stuck at any point in either getting recognized or licensed, feel free to contact the Conference Director or National Manager.

to:

Once recognized by your school, your team must get a club license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process involving a 2 page form and $50 fee, which is even waived for first year clubs.

If you get stuck at any point in either getting recognized or licensed, feel free to contact the Conference Director or National Manager.

Changed lines 11-18 from:

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, then you'll just have to start one! The hardest part about this is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, you should look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines some common club officer roles, constitution elements, and typical aspects of getting a club going on your campus.

Once recognized by your school, your team must get a '''club license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process and the small fee is waived the first year.

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school will submit the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, it is ready to race regardless of whether it has one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and across this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announc mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, should also read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide to help you on your way.

From there, clubs vary enormously. Most clubs receive some financial support from their school, though the range of support is very wide and many schools do not provide funding in the first year. Some clubs remain just a handful of members doing a few races. Others have grown into varsity programs with full time coaches and sophisticated, extensive racing and developmental programs. Where your club goes is up to you, so make it happen!

to:

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, you'll just have to start one! The hardest part is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines some common club officer roles, constitution elements, and typical aspects of getting a club going on your campus.

Once recognized by your school, your team must get a '''club license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process involving a 2 page form and $50 fee, which is even waived for first year clubs.

If you get really stuck at any point in either getting recognized or licensed, feel free to contact the Conference Director or National Manager.

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school submits the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, you're ready to race regardless of whether you have one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and throughout this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announc mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, should also read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide to help you on your way.

From there, clubs vary enormously and the real hard work of recruiting and retaining members, getting to races, and building your team begins. Most clubs receive some financial support from their school, though the range is very wide and many schools do not provide funding in the first year. Some clubs remain just a handful of members doing a few races. Others have grown into varsity programs with full time coaches and sophisticated, extensive racing and developmental programs. Where your club goes is up to you, so make it happen!

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The following is a rough outline of the tasks that must get done by most clubs throughout the academic year.

to:

The following is a rough outline of the basic tasks that must get done by most clubs throughout the academic year. More details are available in the USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide.

Changed lines 77-78 from:

An excellent guide to the process of getting a club started on campus, recognized, and licensed to race.

to:

An excellent guide to the process of getting a club started on campus, recognized, and licensed to race. This is worth reading even if your club is already started.

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Extensive notes and tips from experienced team leaders on .

to:

Extensive notes and tips from experienced team leaders on . Every club officer should read this!!!

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Quick notes on getting your USAC Collegiate club license.

  • USAC Collegiate Get Started Guide
    An excellent guide to the process of getting a club started on campus, recognized, and licensed to race.

  • Extensive notes and tips from experienced team leaders on .
Changed lines 11-15 from:

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, then you'll just have to start one! The hardest part about this is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, you should look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines

Once recognized by their school, every club must get a '''license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process and the fee is waived for first year teams.

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your institution will submit the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, it is ready to race regardless of whether it has one member or a hundred.

to:

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, then you'll just have to start one! The hardest part about this is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, you should look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines some common club officer roles, constitution elements, and typical aspects of getting a club going on your campus.

Once recognized by your school, your team must get a '''club license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process and the small fee is waived the first year.

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your school will submit the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, it is ready to race regardless of whether it has one member or one hundred. Use the resources below and across this website to get your team racing and growing. You should have a few people monitoring the main eccc-announc mailing list so they get timely conference updates, as well as attending the annual ECCC meetings. All officers, old and new, should also read through the phenomenal USAC Collegiate Team Leader's Guide to help you on your way.

From there, clubs vary enormously. Most clubs receive some financial support from their school, though the range of support is very wide and many schools do not provide funding in the first year. Some clubs remain just a handful of members doing a few races. Others have grown into varsity programs with full time coaches and sophisticated, extensive racing and developmental programs. Where your club goes is up to you, so make it happen!

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Who's in the ECCC?

The Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference (ECCC) includes all schools in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Maine. Schools in other states are more than welcome to participate in ECCC races and events, but will be officially part of another conference. To figure out which one, use the map on the USAC Collegiate website.

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If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, then you'll just have to start one! The hardest part about this is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some simple forms. For details, you should look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs.

to:

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, then you'll just have to start one! The hardest part about this is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some short forms. Sometimes you may have to develop a simple club constitution outlining officer roles and the basic rules and conduct of the club, usually based on a template provided by the school. For details, you should look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs. USAC Collegiate also has an excellent starter guide for clubs that outlines

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Student leadership keeps all of the ECCC's teams going. This page collects resources to help club officers successfully develop and grow their teams.

Get Started

to:

Student leadership keeps all of the ECCC's clubs going. This page collects resources to help club officers successfully develop and grow their teams.

Get Started!

If there isn't a cycling club at your school already, then you'll just have to start one! The hardest part about this is simply getting recognized by your school, but even that's usually not hard. Typically it involves getting some number of people (often 10) to express interest in the club and filling out some simple forms. For details, you should look around your school's main and/or athletic websites for information on general and/or sports clubs.

Once recognized by their school, every club must get a '''license from USA Cycling. This license must be renewed every calendar year. Fortunately, this is a very easy and cheap process and the fee is waived for first year teams.

After that, your team is all set. As long as it is a recognized club on campus and your institution will submit the USAC Collegiate club license paperwork, it is ready to race regardless of whether it has one member or a hundred.

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  • Late Summer
    • Get Recognized.\\
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  • Late Summer
    • Get Recognized.\\
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  • Order team kits.\\
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  • Order team kits.\\
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  • Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting.\\
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  • Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting.\\
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  • Winter
    • ''Make sure your riders stay motivated
    • ''Get the club's USAC license squared away
    • ''Make sure you riders get their licenses
    • Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting.\\
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  • Winter
    • Make sure your riders stay motivated
    • Get the club's USAC license squared away
    • Make sure you riders get their licenses
    • Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting.\\
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  • Propose new budget.\\
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  • Propose new budget.\\
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  • Hold elections for new officers.\\
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  • Hold elections for new officers.\\
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The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011.
The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011.
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The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011.
The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011. (:by Dartmouth:)
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  • Order team kits.\\
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  • Order team kits.\\
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  • Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting.\\
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  • Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting.\\
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Winter

  • Make sure your riders stay motivated
    *
    Get the club's USAC license squared away
    * ''Make sure you riders get their licenses
  • Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting.\\
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  • Winter
    • ''Make sure your riders stay motivated
    • ''Get the club's USAC license squared away
    • ''Make sure you riders get their licenses
    • Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting.\\
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Spring

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  • Propose new budget.\\
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  • Propose new budget.\\
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  • Hold elections for new officers.

End of Spring

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  • Hold elections for new officers.

Resources

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ClubOfficers.ClubLicenses

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The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011.
The Dartmouth team plots recruitment and strategy, 2011.
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Late Summer

  • Get Recognized.\\
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  • Late Summer
    • Get Recognized.\\
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Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, a club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers to the school.

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Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school for the year and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, a club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers to the school.

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  Mountain Bike race!
Track race!
Cyclocross race!
Order kits for next spring's clothing
Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting
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  • Mountain Bike race!
    Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
  • Track race!
    Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
  • Cyclocross race!
    Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
  • Order team kits.
    Custom team cycling clothing is feasible and affordable for teams of all

sizes, but has a long fulfillment time. Get your order in by November in order to have your stuff in time for the spring season.

  • Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting.
    The conference meets every year in mid-November to go over general issues, hold team building workshops, and establish the road season schedule. Your team should have someone there!
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  Make sure your riders stay motivated
Get the club's USAC license squared away
Make sure you riders get their licenses
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  • Make sure your riders stay motivated
    *
    Get the club's USAC license squared away
    * ''Make sure you riders get their licenses
  • Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting.
    Mid-February, the conference holds another meeting to check up on the road season and schedule cyclocross, track, and MTB. Your team should have someone there!
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  Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting
  Road race!
  Line up candidates and hold elections for next year's club officers.
  Submit budget request to your school's clubs administrators for next year's funding
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  • Road race!
    Find races, race flyers, and pre-registration links on the (:calendar:).
  • Propose new budget.
    Submit budget request to your school's clubs administrators for next year's funding
  • Hold elections for new officers.
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Late Summer
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Late Summer

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Fall

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Winter

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Spring

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End of Spring

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Late Summer

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Late Summer
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  • Get Recognized. Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, a club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers to the school.
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  • Get Recognized.
    Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, a club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers to the school.
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Late Summer\\

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Late Summer

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  • Late Summer
    Make sure your club is recognized by your school and ready to go
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Late Summer
* Get Recognized. Make sure your club is officially recognized by your school and ready to go. Typically this means submitting a list of officers, a club constitution, roster, and club sports/recreation waivers to the school.

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  • Late Summer\\
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  • Fall Mountain Bike race! Track race! Cyclocross race! Order kits for next spring's clothing
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  • Fall
    Mountain Bike race!
    Track race!
    Cyclocross race!
    Order kits for next spring's clothing\\
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  • Winter
    Make sure your riders stay motivated Get the club's USAC license squared away
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  • Winter
    Make sure your riders stay motivated
    Get the club's USAC license squared away\\
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear

\\

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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear\\
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear\ \ \ \
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear\ \ \ \
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011.
Mama Bear
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. Mama Bear
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"The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. (:by Rutgers:)
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The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011.
Mama Bear


The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. (:by Rutgers:)

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"The Rutgers team says goodbye to Mark Vareschi, the quintessential club officer; 2011. (:by Rutgers:)
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Student leadership keeps all of the ECCC's teams going. This page collects resources to help club officers successfully develop and grow their teams.

Get Started

Annual Calendar

The following is a rough outline of the tasks that must get done by most clubs throughout the academic year.

  • Late Summer
    Make sure your club is recognized by your school and ready to go
  • Fall Mountain Bike race! Track race! Cyclocross race! Order kits for next spring's clothing Attend the ECCC Fall Meeting
  • Winter
    Make sure your riders stay motivated Get the club's USAC license squared away Make sure you riders get their licenses
  • Spring
    Attend the ECCC Spring Meeting Road race! Line up candidates and hold elections for next year's club officers. Submit budget request to your school's clubs administrators for next year's funding
  • End of Spring
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ClubOfficers.ClubLicenses

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ClubOfficers.HostHousing

ClubOfficers.RacePromotion

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ECCC Club Officers

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ECCC Club Officers

– Receive guidance on starting and running a club. – Get information on obtaining or renewing a club license. – Have a ready pointer to share with racers on obtaining their licenses. – Have a ready pointer to share with racers on obtaining upgrades. – Obtain the race schedule for conducting long term planning. – Get flyers for races their team is participating in. – Obtain general information on race costs. – Get ECCC and USAC Collegiate logos for use in team clothing. – Find information on upcoming conference meetings. – Find guidance and policy in promoting a race. – Connect to conference leadership and other teams.

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ECCC Club Officers

last modified October 11, 2011, at 07:26 AM